Saturday, September 3, 2011

Sales clerk interview questions


1. Top 10 interview questions and answers 2017

2. Top 14 tips to prepare job interviews
Sales clerk  interview questions

You can ref sample interview questions for Sales clerk  as follows. You also find more interview resources related to Sales clerk  interview at sidebar such as interview questions answers, interview tips, thank you letters…

List of interview questions

Do you prefer a long or short sales cycle?

Here are sample answers for the interview question "Do you prefer a long sales cycle resulting in the sale of a large ticket item, or a shorter cycle with more frequent sales? " Sample Answer: I think there are interesting points to both types of sales. I like a longer sales cycle, as it gives me time to get to know the customer, and spend time educating them about the benefits and uses of the product. Shorter cycles are more intense, since you typically don't have the luxury of too much personal knowledge of the customer, or the time for lengthy explanations. You need to hit the high priority topics rather quickly.

Why do you want to work with us?

More likely than not, the interviewer wishes to see how much you know about the company culture, and whether you can identify with the organization’s values and vision. Every organization has its strong points, and these are the ones that you should highlight in your answer. For example, if the company emphasizes on integrity with customers, then you mention that you would like to be in such a team because you yourself believe in integrity. It doesn’t have to be a lie. In the case that your values are not in line with the ones by the company, ask yourself if you would be happy working there. If you have no issue with that, go ahead. But if you are aware of the company culture and realize that there is some dilemma you might be facing, you ought to think twice. The best policy is to be honest with yourself, and be honest with the interviewer with what is it in the company culture that motivates you.

How did you land your most successful sale?

When you answer questions about your sales successes, be sure to give a tangible example of how and why you were successful. When applicants are interviewed for a sales job the interviewer is looking for quantifiable accomplishments i.e. closing the sale, 56% increase in revenue year over year, how you made the sale, etc. Sample Answer: My most successful sale was one where I had taken over a customer from another salesperson who had to leave suddenly. I immediately contacted the person, and let them know the situation. I knew that my colleague was having a difficult time getting the client to commit to the purchase of a large motor home. Part of it was circumstantial, but when I was given the opportunity to take over the sale, I was able to give the customer some reflection time, and was ultimately able to close the sale.

What is your biggest professional accomplishment to date?

This is your opportunity to provide an example that shows you can do the job. Think about the skills detailed in the job description and which of your accomplishments most directly relate. The goal is to convey to the hiring manager not only your past successes but also what you are capable of accomplishing if offered the job.

What are your weaknesses?

"What are your weaknesses" is one of the most popular questions interviewers ask. It is also the most dreaded question of all. Handle it by minimizing your weakness and emphasizing your strengths. Stay away from personal qualities and concentrate on professional traits: "I am always working on improving my communication skills to be a more effective presenter. I recently joined Toastmasters, which I find very helpful."

Why should we hire you?

Answer "Why should we hire you" by summarizing your experiences: "With five years' experience working in the financial industry and my proven record of saving the company money, I could make a big difference in your company. I'm confident I would be a great addition to your team."

Why do you want to work here?

By asking you, "Why do you want to work here?" the interviewer is listening for an answer that indicates you've given this some thought and are not sending out resumes just because there is an opening. For example, "I've selected key companies whose mission statements are in line with my values, where I know I could be excited about what the company does, and this company is very high on my list of desirable choices."

What are your goals?

When you're asked, "What are your goals?" sometimes it's best to talk about short-term and intermediate goals rather than locking yourself into the distant future. For example, "My immediate goal is to get a job in a growth-oriented company. My long-term goal will depend on where the company goes. I hope to eventually grow into a position of responsibility."

Why did you leave (or why are you leaving) your job?

If an interviewer asks, "Why did you leave (or why are you leaving) your job?" and you're unemployed, state your reason for leaving in a positive context: "I managed to survive two rounds of corporate downsizing, but the third round was a 20% reduction in the workforce, which included me."

If you are employed, focus on what you want in your next job: "After two years, I made the decision to look for a company that is team-focused, where I can add my experience."

What can you do for us that other candidates can't?

Emphasize what makes you unique when you're asked, "What can you do for us that other candidates can't?". This will take an assessment of your experiences, skills and traits. Summarize concisely: "I have a unique combination of strong technical skills, and the ability to build strong customer relationships. This allows me to use my knowledge and break down information to be more user-friendly."

What are three positive things your last boss would say about you?

It's time to pull out your old performance appraisals and boss's quotes to answer the question, "What are three positive things your last boss would say about you?". This is a great way to brag about yourself through someone else's words: "My boss has told me that I am the best designer he has ever had. He knows he can rely on me, and he likes my sense of humor."

What salary are you seeking?

When you're asked, "What salary are you seeking?" it is to your advantage if the employer tells you the range first. Prepare by knowing the going rate in your area, and your bottom line or walk-away point. One possible answer would be: "I am sure when the time comes, we can agree on a reasonable amount. In what range do you typically pay someone with my background?"

If you were an animal, which one would you want to be?

Don't be alarmed if you're asked, "If you were an animal, which one would you want to be?". Interviewers use this type of psychological question to see if you can think quickly. If you answer "a bunny," you will make a soft, passive impression. If you answer "a lion," you will be seen as aggressive. What type of personality would it take to get the job done? What impression do you want to make?



For more details, pls visit: 150 sales interview questions and answers

II. Job interview tips

1. Research

Prepare a response so you are ready for the question What do you know about this company?
Know the interviewer’s name and use it during the job interview.
If you’re not sure of the name, call and ask prior to the interview. Try to relate what you know about the company when answering questions.

2. Provide Examples


It’s one thing to say you can do something; it’s another to give examples of things you have done. “Come with a toolbox of examples of the work you’ve done,” advises Fogarty. “You should come and anticipate the questions a recruiter’s going to ask based on the requirement of the role. Think of recent strong strategic examples of work you’ve done, then when the question is asked, answer with specifics, not in generalities. You should say, ‘Yes, I’ve done that before. Here’s an example of a time I did that…,’ and then come back and ask the recruiter, ‘Did that answer your question?’”

3. First impressions count


Greet your interviewer with a smile and firm handshake. Give eye contact. Try to make small talk during the walk from the reception area to the interview room. Liz Anderson, a human resources manager says, “You have to sell yourself before you can sell anything else and the first 30 seconds are when the interviewer subconsciously makes decisions about whether they like you or not and whether you will fit into the team.”

4. Practice your answers 


Although there is no set format that every job interview will follow, there are some questions that you can almost guarantee will crop up. You should prepare answers to questions about your personal strengths and weaknesses, as well as being able to explain why you would be the best person for the job.

5. Ask questions 


You should always have some questions for your interviewer to demonstrate your interest in the position. Prepare a minimum of five questions, some which will give you more information about the job, and some which delve deeper into the culture and goals of the company.

6. Follow Up


Always follow-up with a thank you note reiterating your interest in the position. If you interview with multiple people send each one a personal thank you note. Send your thank you note (email is fine) within 24 hours of your interview.

III. Other job interview materials:

• 150 sales interview questions and answers
• 440 behavioral interview questions
• Top 12 secrets to win every job interviews
• 13 types of interview questions and how to sovle them
• Top 36 situational interview questions
• 95 management interview questions and answers
• 30 phone interview questions
• 45 internship interview questions

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